Legacy Land Conservancy Protects New Chelsea-area Property

Ann Arbor, Michigan – Larry and Stephanie Doll of Chelsea have chosen Legacy Land Conservancy to protect 10 acres of woods and wetland in Sylvan Township.  This parcel is part of more than 550 acres of land previously protected in the headwaters surrounding Mill Creek, a primary tributary to the Huron River.

Larry originally purchased the property, which adjoins the 150 year-old Doll Family Farm, with the idea of building a home on the steep hillside above the wetland.  As he came to enjoy the property’s peace and natural beauty, he became increasingly convinced that he should protect these natural features permanently.

Newly protected land is located in the headwaters surrounding Mill Creek, a primary tributary to the Huron River

Newly protected land is located in the headwaters surrounding Mill Creek, a primary tributary to the Huron River

When his neighbors began to protect their land, Larry began explore to conservation options with Legacy Land Conservancy.   According to Larry, “Working with Legacy was great. They took the time needed to be sure I was comfortable with all aspects of the plan.  Hopefully, more farmers and landowners in Western Washtenaw and Eastern Jackson counties will follow suit and preserve this beautiful land of ours.”

Conservation and a love of the land runs in the Doll family, says Larry.  “Soon, there will be a Conservation Easement on my Father’s property to the southeast. I grew up rambling around these acres, and to know that it will be free from development forever is a very satisfying feeling.”

Legacy Executive Director Susan Lackey reflected on the importance of this small parcel.  “The land in this area drains directly to Mill Creek, which originates here in the Sharon Short Hills,” Lackey notes. “The combination of these headwaters, along with the geology of the Short Hills, means that the area hosts a variety of special habitats and rare and endangered species.  This makes it especially important to conserve as much of the undeveloped land as possible in the area, in order to protect these rare systems and the water quality.

“In this context,” says Lackey, “even small parcels become part of an important strategy for conservation.”

Conservation tools like easements protect habitats and water quality

Conservation tools like easements protect habitats and water quality

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